Kid Sewing: Little Bathrobe and Bonus Shorts

In 2014, when I had been sewing for about a year, I made some hooded robes for our nephew and our godson. Both boys were 3 at the time and have definitely outgrown the robes now that they are getting ready for 1st grade in the fall. But our nephew has a pair of toddler twin brothers who are just growing into the robe, so my sisters-in-law requested a second robe so the twins can wear them together. It’s a simple pattern that offers the chance to sew with bright colors that I would never wear myself, so who could say no?

Beach Robes via sweetalchemy.wordpress.com

The original robes made in 2014–the red robe went to my nephew

I used the Beach Robe pattern from Made Everyday by Dana (which was previously just MADE). I made the second size, which is meant to fit 18 mos – 3 years. Like the first robes, I opted for short sleeves, a partial tie, and a lined hood. Like the first robes, I also used the cheapest, thinnest towels available at Target for the fabric. You want to use a thin towel or the robe would end up way too bulky. I’m pretty sure the towels I got were labeled “quick dry” towels or something like that. I think they were ~$4 each?

Beach Robe from Made Everyday

I like this pattern enough to have made it three times now, and I like it enough to make it again in the future, but there are some things about it that annoy me. One of them is that the pattern doesn’t indicate how much fabric you need to line the hood. For the record, I bought ½ yard of lining fabric for the first two robes I made, but I easily got the hood lining pieces for this robe from a single fat quarter. My second big annoyance is that the pattern doesn’t include a pattern piece for the robe ties—it just gives you dimensions for cutting them. I realize that some people would prefer this to printing off more sheets for a pdf pattern, but I am lazy and would prefer the ease of a pattern piece.

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I made a couple of recommendations for anyone making this pattern the first time I posted about it, and I still stand by them. The pattern recommends attaching the bias binding in one pass, which is bananas to me and seems like it would be so sloppy and frustrating. I did the more traditional 2-step application method, sewing one side of the binding on at the fold line, folding the binding over the raw edge, and then top-stitching the binding in place.

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I’d also recommend ignoring the order of construction in the pattern and sewing the sleeves in flat. I actually set them in on this robe (because I was too lazy to go back and read my own post on this pattern) and felt it was unnecessarily fiddly. My final recommendation is that you really have to accept that the ends of the ties are never going to be perfect—you’re probably going to end up with a bit of wobbly stitching and a couple of puckers in the binding. The ties on this robe definitely benefitted from three more years of sewing experience, but still. It’s hard to get ½” wide double bias binding around that tight curve. (I think this last recommendation is mostly for me, because I have issues with perfectionism and those damn robe ties make my eye twitch.)

I’m equally horrified and fascinated by the possibility of seeing the new robe next to the original, given how much I think I’ve grown as a sewist in the last three years. Making this pattern definitely felt a lot easier and faster this time around, and I had the benefit of no longer being intimidated by bias binding. Plus, having a serger definitely helped—it was so much easier to finish the seams and helped keep the bulk under control.

Kid Shorts from Made Everyday

Since I had fun making a tiny thing in bright colors, I took another hour or so to whip up a little pair of shorts with some extra fabric that’s been hanging out in my stash for years. This is another Made Everyday pattern—the Kid Shorts Pattern. I sewed up the 12 mos size in the longer leg length with a simple elastic waistband and front pockets. I have a weakness for tiny, useless pockets. My hope is that our baby will be able to wear these next summer, and it should be pretty easy to adjust the elastic to fit better if necessary. If they don’t fit, I’ve got an easy gift on hand for someone else’s kid in the future. Either way, a quick and fun little project!

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