R&R Hoodie

Like a lot of knitters, I suspect, I find myself getting bogged down by finishing. It’s weird to think that you can spend hours and hours forming individual stitch after individual stitch, turning hundreds of yards of yarn into a wearable object only to feel like weaving in a few ends or sewing on a couple of buttons is just too much to ask of yourself at that moment. And yet…

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I’m not one for starting a project and then letting it sit around partially knit for a long time. I’m pretty monogamous in my knitting. But that doesn’t mean I haven’t had a ton of projects that sit around for months after I cast off the last stitch, just waiting for me to do the final finishing work. I don’t even mind the finishing work—I usually find it really satisfying once I sit down to do it. I just always seem to find myself having a huge mental block when it comes to finishing.

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According to my Ravelry notebook (which I had to consult because it had been so long I’d completely forgotten), I finished knitting this sweater July 21st, 2017. I was even diligent and tacked the edges of the pockets down and weaved in all of my ends before I marked it as “finished” on Ravelry. Looking back through my Instagram feed, it looks like it took me seven months to actually buy a zipper. And then, of course, it took yet another seven months before I sat down and actually sewed the damn zipper into the sweater. Ridiculous! I mean, I’ve procrastinated on project finishing before, but I think this project wins the prize.

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Ultimately, I think the big block for me was the fact that I needed to shorten the zipper, which I’ve not done before. As is usually the case when I’m intimidated by something new or unknown, I really just needed to sit down for a bit to work on the problem and figure it out. After watching a couple of videos, I ended up just cutting off the extra zipper, pulling out the remaining zipper coil with my seam ripper, and then using some quick hand stitches to create new zipper tops. And from there, it was just a couple of naptime sewing sessions in front of the tv before the zipper was completely installed. (I use this process for sewing in zippers, which always gives me good results.)

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Yes. I took advantage of having my child captive in a Target cart to get blog pictures. Lol.

The pattern is the R&R Hoodie from Tanis Fiber Arts, and I knit it up using Malabrigo Rios in the Glazed Carrot colorway. I used three skeins and alternated between them to account for the dye differences between skeins. Although I started knitting this while I was still pregnant two summers ago, I knew that I wanted it to be wearable the fall after Jude turned one (so, you know, now). The pattern has a 6-12 month size, which I worried would be too small for this season, and a 2-4 year old size, which I worried would be too big.

Ultimately, I decided to knit the 6-12 month size with some extra length to get something between sizes. I believe I added an inch to the body and the sleeves and maybe half an inch to the hood. The modifications worked out nicely—Jude is currently wearing an 18 months size and the sweater fits him very well. I think there’s even enough length left in the sleeves and the body for him to wear this throughout this coming winter.

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After waiting over a year to sew the zipper in, I’m just incredibly relieved that he’ll actually get to wear it before it’s too small!

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Being goofy at the grocery store.

Brooklyn to Halifax Hoodie

Would you be shocked to know that Christina Ricci’s Wednesday Addams was one of my childhood heroes? Of course you wouldn’t be shocked. I mean–just look at this hoodie.

Hey June Halifax Hoodie

This project actually started it’s life back in May as the SBCC Brooklyn Hoodie. The Brooklyn has a relaxed, classic fit that just didn’t play nicely with this fairly limp, unstructured cotton French Terry. (Also, I’m not sure I get the deep love for French Terry as a fabric. People seem to praise it for being really soft, but this fabric doesn’t seem extraordinarily so–at least not more so than sweatshirt fleece. Plus it sheds everywhere. Maybe it’s just that I prefer body over softness in a fabric?) Of course, I didn’t realize that the fabric and pattern were a poor match until I’d cut everything out and sewed the body together.

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Earlier this month, I decided to see if I could salvage the fabric by recutting the pieces using a more fitted pattern. I decided to use View C of the Hey June Halifax Hoodie pattern. I was able to cut the Halifax fronts and back from the already-cut front and back pieces and then had enough extra fabric to cut the sleeve pieces for the Halifax.

Hey June Halifax Hoodie

Because this was a salvage operation, some of the details on my hoodie are different than they would appear if I had made the Halifax pattern as drafted. My hoodie is shorter through the body since it’s cut to the length of the Brooklyn. I also used the pocket, hood, sleeve cuff, and hem band pieces that I had already cut out using the Brooklyn pattern, adjusting them slightly as necessary to make them work.

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But where it counts in terms of fit–through the body and the sleeves–this is the Halifax Hoodie. Since I wanted something fairly fitted, I went with a smaller size than my measurements would recommend. My current measurements (for reference: Bust 41″ and Hip 45.25″) would put me around a 1x according to the Hey June size chart. Based on the finished measurements indicated on the pattern, I cut a straight XL. I’m fairly happy with the final fit, which is very similar to the fit of an Old Navy hoodie that I wear all the time.

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My only complaint about this pattern is the number of pattern pieces that call for being cut on the fold. I hate when relatively small pieces like sleeve cuffs are meant to be cut on the fold, especially since you need to cut 2. The sleeve is also cut on the fold, which is one of my pet peeves–not just because it would be infinitely more convenient to cut both sleeves at once but even more so because sleeve caps with symmetrical fronts and backs don’t tend to fit that well. You can see that there’s excess fabric at the front sleeve cap–something I’d probably try to get rid of if I made this pattern again. I also printed the pattern piece for the cowl neck since I was considering making up View D or E with another piece of fabric. The cowl neck actually has two “cut on fold” lines that run perpendicular to each other as though you are supposed to fold your fabric in quarters and cut the cowl that way. I mean, I didn’t and wouldn’t actually follow those instructions–I just traced the pattern piece, flipped it over, and traced the other side. But it’s still annoying that the pattern pieces are organized that way. I’d much rather print a few extra pages than have so many “cut on the fold” pieces.

Hey June Halifax Hoodie

Still, I’m happy with how this one turned out and even happier that I was able to save a project that nearly ended up in the trash. I feel like it’s a sign that my sewing skills and confidence have increased.