Get Moving Hoodie

The name of this pattern taunts me. So bossy! Despite its imperative, this hoodie has not gotten me moving in the way intended. Instead, I have been wearing this while engaging in low-octane activities like grading, lounging, and grocery shopping. Still, it’s really comfortable and I’m very happy with the way this project turned out.

Ottobre 05/2015 Get Moving Hoodie

This is my third Ottobre pattern–it comes from the 05/2015 issue of Ottobre Woman. Like the other two patterns I’ve made, I like this piece because it is a comfortable basic but has enough details to make it interesting to sew and interesting to wear. This hoodie has a saddle shoulder and pockets that are hard to describe—they aren’t really welt pockets, but the concept is kind of the same. I guess they are kind of a more casual, informal version of a welt pocket? The sleeve and hood seams are all topstitched, which make them look professional and kind of sporty. Like my Gym and Sport Sweat Shorts, I used a honeycomb stitch for the top-stitching. The fabric is a cotton blend sweatshirt fleece from Girl Charlee.

Ottobre 05/2015 Get Moving Hoodie

The most difficult part of this pattern was actually the tracing. Ottobre using the crazy pattern sheets with the overlapping lines that you have to trace off. I’ve traced five other Ottobre patterns that were very easy, but this one was a pain. The pattern pieces for this hoodie are the same basic pieces used for three or four other views in the issue. However, the other views involve different pattern markings and have different cutting lines for length and necklines. All the different markings made it quite a chore to distinguish what, exactly, I needed to trace for this view from what was irrelevant. Of course, the upside of all this is that I can use the fit adjustments that I made with this pattern as a starting point for any of the other views I might be interested in.

Ottobre 05/2015 Get Moving Hoodie

As far as fit adjustments go, I started with the size 46 at the upper torso, blended to a 48 at the armscye, to a 50 at the waist, and then to a 52 at the hip. I also did a 1.5” FBA and eased the resulting dart into the side seam at bust level. I removed 1” of length from the sleeves.

Ottobre 05/2015 Get Moving Hoodie

When I first finished this piece, I was worried that there was too much ease through the hips, although after sending it through the washer and dryer once, I’m more satisfied with the fit. I’m also glad I made this piece in black because my work with the pockets is kind of sloppy—sewing around the sharp turns for the pocket bag was tricky. But the dark color hides most of the issues.

This was my first time installing grommets, which was pretty fun. I used a Dritz eyelet kit from JoAnn’s that was pretty inexpensive and easy to manage. Now I just need one of these mini anvils.

Ottobre 05/2015 Get Moving Hoodie

I have a weakness for hoods and shawl collars. I’m glad to have this sweatshirt, especially because I like the fit through the shoulders. But I also have more sweatshirt fleece coming to me so that I can make the SBCC Brooklyn Hoodie. And then, maybe, I’ll consider sewing something I can actually wear to work. We’ll see.

Ottobre 05/2015 Get Moving Hoodie

McCalls 6992

I finally have a finished sewing project to show off. I think the last time I posted about a finished garment was sometime in October? I’ve been sewing since then and have finished several things, but nothing that feels worth posting about—just super simple things like pajama pants and t-shirts.

M6992

I can’t say that this project is terribly exciting either, but it’s at least a new (to me) pattern. This is McCalls 6992, which is just a basic raglan sweatshirt pattern, not unlike the basic sweatshirt patterns that just about every pattern company seems to have released in the past year. I’m pleased with this McCalls version and would definitely make it again.

There’s not much to say about it given that it’s such a simple silhouette that’s easy to put together. I made View D, which has a shaped hem with a slight hi-low effect, rather than a traditional sweatshirt band at the bottom. This pattern uses a shoulder dart to help shape the sleeves and neckline, and I like the fit through the shoulders that you get with the darts. They not only keep the neckline lying flat at the shoulder, but I feel like they also help to define the shape of my shoulders and thus mitigate some of the shoulder-rounding effect of the raglan sleeve that usually makes a raglan sweater look kind of crappy on my body. (Of course, I might just be imagining this shoulder-defining effect, but I do feel like this shirt looks better on me than many raglan shirts I’ve had in the past.)

M6992

I made a lot of my usual changes—I started with the size 18, blended to the 22 at the underarm, and then blended to the 24 at the hip. I also made a 1″ FBA (by which I mean I added 1″ to the pattern piece and thus 2″ overall to the front–do you call this a 1″ FBA or a 2″ FBA? I have no idea.) I pinned a dart out at the side when I did a basted fitting. I also lowered the neckline by about 1.5″ just because I don’t like the way a high neckline feels. If/when I make this again, I’ll probably only blend out to the 20 at the underarm and then add in a bit more waist shaping at the sides. But as it is, I’m pleased with the fit on this as a first version.

M6992

The fabric I used is a double-faced cotton jersey blend from Girl Charlee. One side is solid black and the other side has black and charcoal stripes. My favorite part of this fabric is that by using the black side for the sleeves, I saved myself a lot of stripe-matching pain. This fabric is super-soft and also very warm. The only downside is that it attracts a crazy amount of hair, which is not an ideal state of affairs for someone with long hair and multiple cats.

Before sewing this, I spent a week or so just prepping and cutting out a stack of projects. I don’t really mind altering patterns or cutting out fabric, but it does require some different tools and a different organization of my small sewing space. I’m finding that it helps if I just seize the cutting momentum and get a bunch of projects ready rather then cutting and sewing one project at a time. So, barring a series of sewing disasters, I should have some more sewing projects to share in the near future—or at least before another four months has passed!